Maserati traces its Granturismo linage all the way back to the A6 1500 launched 75 years ago, and now it's about to make a significant departure from the original script by throwing electrification into the mix.

The last Granturismo ended production in 2019, after a 12-year run, but a redesigned model, unveiled on Monday, is headed to showrooms next spring with the choice of gas or electric powertrains. It should arrive as 2024 model. Pricing has yet to be announced, but Maserati hinted at something close to $200,000.

The car will come in three variants: Modena, Trofeo, and Folgore (late arrival). The Granturismo convertible, or Grancabrio in some markets, is also due in 2023, though exact timing has yet to be announced. A special Primaserie 75th Anniversary model will also be available at launch.

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Modena

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Modena

The Modena is the most luxurious, lifestyle-oriented option, while the Trofeo is aimed at sporty types. The Folgore is the electric option, the name taken from the Italian word for “lightning.” Maserati will use Folgore on all of its EVs, including upcoming electric versions of the Grecale crossover and MC20 supercar.

The Modena and Trofeo versions come with Maserati's twin-turbo 3.0-liter V-6 shared with the MC20, albeit with less power and minus the dry-sump lubrication system. The Maserati-designed V-6 delivers 490 hp in the Modena and 550 hp in the Trofeo. In both cases, there's an 8-speed automatic, all-wheel drive, and 0-62 mph times of less than four seconds.

Oddly, the Folgore doesn't have the 1,200-hp headline figure that was previously touted by Maserati. That figure refers to the total output of the car's three electric motors (one at the front and two at the rear), but peak output of the Folgore is actually 760 hp, limited by the discharge capacity of the car's T-shaped battery. The battery is a 92.5-kwh unit that will deliver a competitive range, which points to something around 300 miles, with mixed driving. An 800-volt architecture means high-speed charging will be possible. Expect the ability to add 100 miles in around 10 minutes using a DC fast charger. Performance figures for the Folgore include 0-62 mph acceleration in 2.7 seconds and a top speed of 199 mph, and the car will also have a distinct, Maserati-tuned sound.

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Folgore

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Folgore

Both the gas and electric versions use the same modular platform that Maserati may provide to other brands in the Stellantis fold. It features multi-material construction (aluminum, magnesium, and steel), resulting in a relatively light weight of 3,957 lb for the gas versions and slightly above 4,850 lb for the electric version whose battery alone weighs about 1,322 lb. The suspension is a mutli-link design with air springs and adjustable dampers. Another key feature of the platform is the electronic architecture that Maserati calls Atlantis. The system is controlled by Maserati's own software and enables over-the-air updates as well as a level of cyber-security.

Fans of Maserati will have to get used to electric power. Like most major automakers, Maserati is committed to an EV future. The Grecale Folgore has already been revealed. The MC20 Folgore should be next, after which Maserati will launch redesigned versions of the Quattroporte and Levante, possibly with electric power only. They will all arrive by 2025. The Ghibli won't get a repeat, Maserati has confirmed, at least in its current form.

The previous Granturismo is still one of the most handsome large coupes around, so topping it was always going to be a challenge. Maserati's design team decided to keep what works and modernize things through some of the details and surfaces. LEDs feature at both ends.

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo

2024 Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo

The proportions have been improved, though, with the car sitting almost an inch lower and measuring close to 0.8 in wider, providing the new Granturismo with an imposing stance. The lower height has also resulted in a lower seating position, which should translate to a sportier feel behind the wheel.

Maserati has yet to reveal the design of the 2+2 cabin but we know there will be digital screens, including a 12.2-inch instrument cluster, a 12.3-inch Android-based infotainment system, and an 8.8-inch climate screen. These screens will have different graphics depending on the variant. Physical controls will still be provided for key functions, including gear selection. One interesting element will be a digital watch that can swap between multiple faces, including a compass. The watch will also have a wave graphic designed to provide some visual feedback for the car's voice activation. Other features will include an available head-up display, Sonus Faber audio (14 speakers standard and 19 available), and multiple trim options.