Class of 2019: Hagerty's top 10 classic cars to buy this year


Another year, another round of bullish predictions for what cars will soon become tomorrow's hot-ticket collector vehicles. This is the second year Hagerty produced its "Bull Market List," and it's more varied than ever.

These aren't new cars the classic car insurer believes will become tomorrow's classics. Instead, they are older cars that have nearly bottomed out on the depreciation curve. In some cases, they've appreciated in value as younger car collectors flood the insurer with quote requests.

Sit back, take notes, and consider which of these future collectibles you'd like to add to your garage. The following are Hagerty's top 10 classic cars to buy in 2019.

1973 BMW 3.0CSL, photo by DW Burnett

1973 BMW 3.0CSL, photo by DW Burnett

1972-1975 BMW 3.0CSL

BMW built only 1,265 of its big sedan over four years but it was a significant car. The 3.0CSL launched the M brand, introduced the kick-up at the quarter rear window known as the Hofmeister kink, and became BMW's first art car. The "L" stood for lightweight, and the car featured thinner metal and aluminum panels to cut 400 pounds form the standard 3.0CS. A tuned suspension with Bilstein shocks teamed with aerodynamic touches to improve performance. A 3.0-liter inline-6 made 180 horsepower initially, but that increased to 206 hp when the engine grew to 3.2 liters and added fuel injection. The 3.0CSL was never sold in the U.S., and the few cars that are here go for $218,500-$264,700 in No. 2 shape, which Hagerty defines as excellent and capable of winning regional or local shows. Hagerty has seen a 10-percent rise in value in the last year with room to grow.

2003 Porsche Boxster S, photo by DW Burnett

2003 Porsche Boxster S, photo by DW Burnett

1997-2004 Porsche Boxster

The spiritual successor to the 914, the mid-engine Boxster arrived to help Porsche regain profitability. Thanks to work with former Toyota consultants, it shares many components with the 996-generation Porsche 911, especially from the windshield forward. The Boxster was released as a base model first with a 2.5-liter flat-6 that made 201 hp. The S model didn't arrive until 2000, and it featured a 250-hp 3.2-liter flat-6 as well as a sportier suspension with 17-inch wheels in place of the base's 16s. Build-quality issues helped tank prices over the past decade-plus, but Hagerty says low-mileage examples will soon begin to appreciate. The company says current prices for a 986-generation Boxster range from $13,800 to $17,200.

1989 Saleen Mustang, photo by Sandon Voelker

1989 Saleen Mustang, photo by Sandon Voelker

1984-1993 Saleen Mustang

Hagerty calls the Fox-body Saleen Mustangs the early Shelby GT350s of the 1980s. Built by tuner Steve Saleen, who would later build the S7 supercar, they were essentially SCCA club racers for the street. Saleen Autosport started with stock 225-hp V-8 Mustangs and added stiffer springs and dampers, bigger brakes, some of the exterior panels for which it was known, and interior bits that included a Momo steering wheel and Flofit front buckets. The cars sold for about $25,000 at the time, which was considerably more than a Mustang LX or GT, and they came with a Ford warranty. Saleen Mustangs now go for about the same price as a good-condition Fox-body Mustang. Hagerty believes that will change quickly and quotes current values at $26,400 to $32,500.


 
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