Gordon Murray has designed many things, including multiple championship-winning Formula One cars and the iconic McLaren F1 supercar. He's now working on a new car, one he labels the last and greatest "analog" supercar.

Called the T50, the new car is set to be revealed in May and Gordon Murray has provided a taste via a new video. The video shows some of the development for the V-12 that will power the car.

The engine is being developed by Cosworth which recently conducted some high-rev and emissions testing using a 3-cylinder mule. Listen to the impressive sound the mule makes and realize that it represents only one quarter of the complete engine.

Murray has said the complete engine will rev to 12,100 rpm, or higher than any previous road car. The figure is also about 1,000 rpm higher than what Aston Martin and Mercedes-AMG are promising for their respective Valkyrie and One hypercars.

Teaser for GMA T50 supercar due in 2022

Teaser for GMA T50 supercar due in 2022

We also know the engine will feature a 3.9-liter displacement, a narrow 65-degree cylinder bank, dry sump lubrication, and a peak output of 650 horsepower and 332 pound-feet of torque. Drive in the T50 will be to the rear wheels only, via a 6-speed manual transmission.

The engine will also feature a mild-hybrid setup, in this case a 48-volt motor-generator that can add 30 hp temporarily. It means peak output in the T50 can be boosted to about 700 hp thanks also to a ram induction system.

Other impressive features of the car will be a downforce-generating rear fan and lightweight construction. The latter should result in a weight of just 2,160 pounds, or about a third less than most supercars on the market.

The first examples of the T50 are due in early 2022 and sadly just 100 will be built for road use (25 track versions are still a possibility), each of them with a price tag of $2.5 million. The good news is that the T50 is just the first model from a Murray's new car brand Gordon Murray Automotive which specializes in low-volume performance cars.