Hot on the heels of Wednesday's reveal of the updated 2023 BMW X7 comes our first look at the Alpina-tuned version of the luxury three-row SUV, the XB7.

The updated X7 reaches dealerships this fall and the Alpina version will follow early next year. Pricing hasn't been announced but the last XB7 was priced from $‭142,295, including destination, and we can expect a similar figure for the updated model's sticker.

Like the regular X7, the updated version of the Alpina XB7 sports a bold new look with split headlights, an illuminated grille, and a front fascia with pronounced air intakes. Alpina has only released the single photo above, but we know there's also an Alpine-specific fascia at the rear. Alpina also has two separate wheel designs for the uprated XB7, both measuring 21 inches in diameter.

The big news is the new powertrain. It consists of a newly developed 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 (code-named S68) mated to a mild-hybrid system. The V-8 alone delivers a peak 630 hp and 590 lb-ft of torque, and the 48-volt mild-hybrid system can add a temporary boost during high-load situations. Alpina quotes a 0-60 mph time of 4.0 seconds and a top speed of 180 mph.

The engine is mated to the same 8-speed automatic transmission used in the X7, albeit with upgrades designed to cope with the extra torque while also providing quicker shifts, and drive is to all four wheels. A limited-slip differential at the rear axle further helps to improve handling at the limit. All-wheel steering and active roll stabilization should also feature as standard in the XB7.

There should also be some Alpina touches in the cabin, like a new steering wheel design and unique material choices for the seat trim. The updated X7 on which this BX7 is based has benefited from a major step up in luxury over the previous X7, including a new design for the center console as well as the addition of a floating screen for the instrument cluster and infotainment hub, similar to what you'll find in the iX electric SUV.

Full specifications for the XB7 will be announced closer to next year's market launch.

Alpina has been making BMWs go faster for more than 50 years, and has generally operated as a semi-official tuner. However, BMW made the partnership official in March by buying the rights to the Alpina brand. Starting from 2025, Alpina vehicles will be built by BMW at its own plants. Alpina's own operations will focus on vehicle development, as well as servicing, plus parts and accessories. The move will enable BMW to substantially increase the number of Alpinas built annually from the current rate of only a few thousand vehicles per year.