Lamborghini was started because Ferraris were too unreliable


It's one of the greatest rivalries of the automotive industry: Ferrari vs. Lamborghini. Actually, it's not just a rivalry, Lamborghini was a direct result of Ferrari.

According to the story, retold by Donut Media, company founder Ferruccio Lamborghini didn't just want to build a better sports car, he wanted to basically shame Enzo Ferrari.

Lamborghini himself built an empire assembling and selling tractors, and he spent quite a bit of money purchasing Ferraris. But after numerous mechanical failures, Lamborghini confronted Ferrari over quality concerns. So the story goes, Ferrari dismissed him.

Instead of returning to tractors, Lamborghini rounded up the best Italian automotive figureheads to begin building cars.

Lamborghini first modified a Ferrari 250 GT, and it was actually more reliable after the modifications. After that vindication, Lamborghini brought on Giotto Bizzarrini, a former Ferrari engineer, and asked him to build a reliable V-12 for a line of road cars. Bizzarrini, however, set about developing a bonkers V-12 engine fit for a racecar.

The engine he developed revved up to 11,000 rpm and Lamborghini used various components of the engine until 2010. Clearly, the engine is a testament to Bizzarrini's craftsmanship.

Lamborghini traded hands a few times over its 50-year history—notably, Chrysler owned the company for a period of time—and scored a few milestone cars like the Miura and Countach, but the brand really flourished under Volkswagen Group, which acquired it in 1998. Arguably, Audi and Volkswagen primed the company for success after the Murcielago debuted, and the Gallardo followed shortly afterward. Today, Lamborghini still churns out insane supercars fit for a bedroom poster.

Grab a full course worth of Lamborghini knowledge in the video up above.

 
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