The speeds achieved by daredevil and all-around bad-ass Jessi Combs leading up to the accident that took her life on Aug. 27 will be submitted to Guinness for world-record consideration, it was announced Saturday. 

Combs died while attempting to set the record for fastest woman on Earth. She completed two runs: one at 515.346 mph and one at 548.432 mph. The average of the two, 531.889 mph, will be submitted for consideration, Autoblog reported on Saturday. If certified, it will top the record currently held by Kitty O'Neil. O'Neil's 512.7-mph mark has remained unbeaten since 1976.

Jessi Combs

Jessi Combs

The announcement came during the dedication of a temporary exhibit in Combs' honor at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. All proceeds from the "Jessi Combs: Life at Full Speed" exhibit will benefit The Jessi Combs Foundation, which is a new organization established by Combs' family and friends. It is dedicated to educating, inspiring, and empowering future stereotype-breaking women like Combs.

Jessi Combs

Jessi Combs

The exhibit, which runs through Sept. 25, includes items from Combs' workshop and studio. Among them are various motorcycle and auto racing helmets, notebooks, welding jackets, and racing trophies. In a statement following her death, Combs' family said her "most notable dream was to become the fastest woman on Earth."

While Combs was widely known for appearing on TV shows such as "Mythbusters," "All Girls Garage," and "Overhaulin'," she also competed in sanctioned motorsports events, including the Baja 1000 and King of Hammers. Her first-place finish at the latter earned her the nickname, "Queen of Hammers."

The exact cause of Combs' crash remains a mystery. The team attempted to recover on-board computers from the remains of the North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger, the jet-powered car in which Combs had made several record attempts going back to 2013.