What's inside Tesla's battery pack?

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EV West has shown us the proper way to break down a Tesla Battery pack. They remove multiple modules in order to reuse them under the skin of cool projects. What if you just want to rip open a module to see what's inside? Well, you don't need to do it as cleanly as EV West. Instead you can just attack it to see its innards.

The "What's Inside" channel, while not strong on standard vehicular knowledge, does know how to take a given item and cut it down to its core. This father-and-son duo recently got their hands on a Tesla battery module and decided to do what they do best.

First, they examine the battery module with the help of a friend who knows EVs. Here, we can see that the module is made of several small cells with cooling lines that run between them. It has layers of metal and plastic on the top and bottom and appears to be well made.

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Next, it's time for the destruction process. This involves shooting the battery with an arrow before deciding that tossing it off a roof is the way to go. Once the destruction gets into full swing, the battery module starts to come apart and this is where you see all of the cooling and tiny battery bits that make up the larger module itself.

This isn't something you should try at home, and the folks in the video do a good job of reminding us of that. Still, it's pretty interesting to see all of the smaller batteries that make up the larger battery unit. Don't forget that all of those smaller batteries in the module combine with even more modules to make an entire Tesla battery pack.

A Model S with an 85 kWh battery pack has 16 modules sitting below the seats. In those 16 modules you'll find more than 7,000 battery cells. It takes a lot of energy storage to do Ludicrous things.

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