Quick Spin: We Drive The 2017 Acura NSX, Ever So Briefly Page 2


-I can't tell you a thing about handling. With its steep banking and long straights, Honda's high-speed oval amounts to a dragstrip for the NSX, especially with the car limited to 118 mph. That gave me little feel for the steering and no feel for the handling. Running in the Sport Plus mode the steering had some nice heft to it at speed, but I can tell you nothing about crispness upon turn-in or low-speed feel. Similarly, the car certainly sits low and promises excellent handling thanks to the vast torque vectoring capabilities of the two motors, but I got no feel for that, either.

ALSO SEE: Honda studying four-motor EV, We drive prototype

However, I did read a couple of the reviews from the journalists who drove it at Laguna Seca. They seem to think the car is prone to understeer, especially when it's not in the Sport Plus or Track modes, and that the standard Continental tires offer poor grip. Acura is touting the NSX as an everyday supercar, and that's likely the reason it understeers—like almost every vehicle on the road today—and that it comes with tires meant more for wear than handling.

When asked if this is the final production spec of the NSX, engineers said the hardware is locked in but the software could change. I suspect that by the time the car goes on sale in March, Acura will make two changes. First, Acura engineers might be wise to dial in more torque vectoring to let the car rotate more willingly. Second, Acura should make the Continental tires a sort of all-season option and the Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires the standard rubber.

We'll drive the production-spec NSX in February. Check back then for a full review and to see how Acura changes its hybrid supercar before it goes on sale.

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