G7 Seeks End Of Fossil Fuels By 2100, Deep Cuts By 2050


Tailpipe Emissions

Tailpipe Emissions

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The revelation is as devastating as enthusiasts have feared: Environmental advocates want to make your car illegal. That's the bad news. The good news? 

We'll all be—almost certainly—dead by then.

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At the recent Group of Seven summit, member nations Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and even the United States all expressed the desire to end any fossil fuel emissions by the end of the century. For those keeping score, that means we've got roughly 85 years before authorities come kicking in garage doors looking to send firebreathing Hellcats back from whence they came

Of course, if wishes were horsepower, we'd all have wicked rides.

Because while the G7 is comprised of leaders of some of the world's most powerful nations, it has no regulatory power, so it doesn't set hard deadlines as much as reflect broad trends. But there's no doubt that efforts to curb emissions by 40-70 percent by 2050 will have a profound affect on technology and industry in the next few decades. 

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Obviously, there are a tons of moving parts in any plan involving worldwide regulations, not the least of which is the need to help poor countries develop clean energy and manage the consequences of climate change. And while the meeting was short on specifics, the most important revelation might be that powerful forces are aligning against fossil fuels—and by extension, the machines they fuel—to a degree we've not yet seen. The idea of a world without them has entered the conversation on the global stage, and that bell can't be unrung.

We're just glad we're already seeing proof green doesn't have to mean boring

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