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Latest Inside Koenigsegg Episode Looks At 3D Printing Supercar Parts: Video

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Koenigsegg is a fascinating company, appearing virtually out of nowhere into its position as one of the world's leading supercar producers. When you consider how many automotive companies fail within a few years of starting up, Koenigsegg's high regard among established supercar brands is all the more impressive.

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YouTube's /DRIVE network has been giving us an insight into the Swedish firm in a series of videos, and now its latest has hit the internet. In the new installment, Koenigsegg CEO and founder Christian von Koenigsegg explains how the company is using the latest technological advancements to ensure its cars are lightweight and as advanced as possible--in particular, how Koenigsegg exploits the benefits of 3D printing technology.

The incredible intricacy by which 3D printing allows components to be produced, and the relatively low cost associated with making a one-off prototype part, means the company now uses the technology to explore the feel and shape of smaller items before forming them into real car components. Christian uses the car's door mirrors and intricate pedal assemblies as examples--after designing them on computer, 3D printers can accurately recreate shapes for full-scale models. If the shape works with the rest of the car, they can then be manufactured from the correct materials.

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Koenigsegg also uses 3D laser scanning technology to shape the car's seats, digitally transferring the shape of a prototype mold to computer before exploring different shapes and thicknesses of foam. And some components, such as the exhaust tip on the new One:1 model, are fully 3D printed from titanium--some of the largest such components in the world. For low volumes and light-weight components, it's more cost-effective and far more intricate than tooling up for cast parts. Soon, the company could even produce components from 3D printed carbon-fiber...

Watch the video above to get the full low-down on the company's latest techniques, and leave any thoughts in the comments section below.

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