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Facelifted Porsche Cayman and Boxster debut in L.A.


The 2.0L TFSI engine in the Audi TTS delivers 265hp (198kW) and 258lb-ft (350Nm) of torque

The 2.0L TFSI engine in the Audi TTS delivers 265hp (198kW) and 258lb-ft (350Nm) of torque

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So far 2008 has been about the renewal and reinvigoration of Porsche's 911 lineup, with the highest-performance variants still to receive their dual-clutch PDK gearboxes and direct-injection upgrades. Next year will be an even bigger year for Porsche, however, as there are more updated 911 models due as well as the facelifted Cayman and Boxster

The first official images and details for the 2010 Porsche Cayman and Boxster have now been revealed, just hours before the cars make their world debut at this week’s Los Angeles Auto Show.

Set to go on sale next year as 2010 models, the new Cayman and Boxster can be distinguished from the current models by their slightly revised headlights, tweaks to the air intakes, and the addition of LED tail lights.

For the first time both models are available with a Lights Package featuring bi-xenon headlights, dynamic curve lights and LED daytime driving lights. Replacing the foglamps, these light units are made up on the Boxster of four LEDs positioned next to one another, while on the Cayman four LEDs are arranged in round light units like the eyes of a dice.

The highlight of the new range is the latest flat-six boxer engines developed with new technical features from the ground up, providing not only more power, but also significantly greater fuel efficiency than their predecessors. A further improvement of both fuel economy and performance is also gained with the addition of the new Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) dual-clutch gearbox.

Displacing 2.9L, the base engine now develops 255hp (188kW) in the Boxster and 265hp (195kW) in the Cayman, an increase by 10 and, respectively, 20hp over the preceding models. The 3.4L power unit in the S-versions, benefiting from direct fuel injection, now delivers 310hp (228kW) in the Boxster S and 320hp (235kW) in the Cayman S, up by 15 and, respectively, 25hp.

This means that there is now a power-to-weight ratio ranging from 4.2kg (9.3lb)/hp on the Cayman S to 5.2kg (11.5lb)/hp on the Boxster. As a result, the Cayman S with PDK and launch control featured in the optional Sports Chrono Package accelerates to 100km/h in 4.9 seconds, making it the quickest of the range. At the end of the spectrum is the Boxster, equipped with a six-speed manual, which takes 5.9 seconds for the same dash.

Featuring PDK, both the Boxster and the Cayman for the first time deliver fuel-economy below the 9L/100km mark. The 2.9L models with the PDK are the most frugal of the group, delivering fuel-economy of 8.9L/100km (26.4mpg). Cars equipped with the 3.4L engine rate in at 9.2L/100km (25.5mpg).

The mechanical changes don’t end with the powertrain as the cars also receive a new suspension set-up. Modification of the valve control map on the steering transmission serves furthermore to reduce steering forces, giving the Boxster and Cayman even more agile and spontaneous steering behaviour.

The wheels come in new design and are half an inch wider on the base models than on the previous car, allowing for the installation of a larger brake system on the front axle.

The new models are entering the market in February 2009. The base price of the Boxster will be €38,600, while the Cayman will start at €41,700. The Boxster S, meanwhile, will start at €46,700 and the Cayman S will be listed at €51,500. U.S. availability and prices are yet to be announced.
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Comments (15)
  1. It's about time it got a LSD. My cheap*** Mustang GT has an LSD and does 0-60 in 5 flat.
    Now, I know that it doen't stand a chance in the curves, but there have been several Cayman and Boxster owners who have been glum-faced after a quick run to the speed limit around here... :)
     
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  2. And by the way, didn't they say that the LSD was left off so it didn't beat the 911 around the Ring? (Which is a pathetic thing to do, in my opinion) So now what?
     
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  3. Gus -
    I am not knowledgeable about car mechanics but am contemplating a used Cayman S manual after the new ones come out. Hopefully, prices will drop more to my budget. I love to drive but what am I missing with out the LSD?
     
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  4. A limited slip differential forces both rear wheels to do equal work, especially in cornering. If you toss the Cayman into a turn and apply full power, the inside rear tire will start spinning and smoking.
    With an LSD, the torque will be applied to the outside tire as well, and the car will either rocket forward, or if there isn't enough grip, begin a powerslide. This is up to the driver and how much power there is available, but the Mustang GT can do it at will..
     
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  5. Thanks for the explanation. I like the styling of the Cayman better than any 2 seater. I am looking for a drivers car and do not need a huge engine. I am in no hurry and thinking of a used 2007/08 CS next year. I take it you would advise against such a purchase without the LSD?
     
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  6. No.
    I think the Boxster and Cayman are some of the best designed (looks are up to the individual) cars ever. Even without the LSD they have got to be incredible cars to drive, from what a couple of owner I know tell me. If you don't regularly like to push the limit, or do powerslides (which in itself is a limit activity to get around some corners quicker) then the lack of an LSD won't bother you.
     
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  7. Thanks for your help! The LSD was the one isuueI had questions about. I am not going to often push it to the limit so I am fine w/o LSD. I am saving up now and really think the used pricing of the current model will take a good drop once the new one is out.
     
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  8. I like the Cayman, handles great, is pretty peppy, though I bet Porsche wishes it the car was not the biggest threat to the flagship 911. I wish the base engine had recieved DI though.
     
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  9. Gus,

    Regardless of how fast you may be off the line, it is after all still a Mustang. Had we were still living in the Muscle car period, a straight line may carry relevance, fortunately we are not, nor are you. Straight line runs require no talent what so ever and comparing a Mustang to a Porsche gives me every reason you will never own a car of any actual worth. Enjoy your present day drag racing and leave the turns for the big boys, son.
     
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  10. Ok, Stuttgart, there's no need to go over the top. I'd remind you that Pork's best-selling car is its SUV and I'd rather take a spin with Gus in his Mustang than one of those miserable behemoths.
    I'll be interested to see the new Panamera in the flesh, although it doesn't look as nice as some of the new Mercedes coming out (the new gullwing and the CLS are so nice).
    Lastly, has anyone else noticed that the only way you can really tell what model of Pork you're looking at is by the front indicator lights? They just seem to alternate back and forth between being completely round and having a flared shape at the bottom with space for an indicator. Jeremy Clarkson had it right: these guys are pretty lazy when it comes to designing something new! No wonder their profit margins are so huge!
     
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  11. Gus,
    It was real nice of you to help out Dave like that, that was a kind thing to do
     
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  12. it annoys me soo much when car companies tone down a modle so it doesnt beat the best theyve got like the 91 1, if the cayman is going to beat one arounf the track let it! and make the 91 1 better!
     
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  13. what i really really wanna see back on porsches is te absolutely massive rear wheel arches! the turbo is sort of doing it but i mean massive like some erlier models! does anyone agree with me?!, i want to see a little more agression in the porsche designs, they of course still look beautiful but i think a little more agression will get poeple off the competitors and back on to porsche
     
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  14. Yeah I agree with 'Azlan' I own 6 Porsches and none of them have guards big enough to put my picnic basket on.
     
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  15. +25HP? This is an insult! Even Nissan 370Zs at half the price have more horsepower than this. I can't believe we waited so long for so little. Is Porsche incapable of putting the 3.6 or 3.8L engine in the Cayman? If such a simple act is all that it takes to kill the 911, then the 911 deserves to go the way of the dodo bird. Porsche offers too little horsepower for too much money relative to the competition. I'm voting with my wallet and urge everyone on the Internet to boycott Porsche also.
     
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