Hagerty speculates on top 10 future classic cars, and we weigh in


Wouldn't we all love to be Marty McFly? Then we could travel back in time to 1955, play Chuck Berry's 1958 song "Johnny B. Goode," and look like geniuses.

The car guy equivalent would be going back to 1995, buying a Porsche 911 GT2 for just over six figures, socking it away for a couple decades, then selling it for $2.4 million today.

Some cars appreciate value after they're released. The trick is in identifying them when new.

Hagerty, the leading insurance provider for classic cars, is attempting to do just that with its latest "Hagerty Hot List." To get on the list, vehicles have to be produced for the 2017 model year and be priced at less than $100,000.

Should you channel your inner McFly, buy these vehicles, and sock them away? We can't recommend that. We feel that some of these vehicles will become collectibles—others won't. Even those that do appreciate will likely decrease in value first, bottom out, then begin to rise in value.

Here is the list, along with our take on each.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio

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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. With a Ferrari-sourced twin-turbocharged 2.9-liter V-6 under the hood, the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio delivers some real performance numbers. It launches to 60 mph in just 3.8 seconds and it conquered the Nürburgring-Nordschleife in just 7 minutes, 39 seconds, which was a sedan record until the Porsche Panamera Turbo bested it. We feel the Quadrifoglio is an uncompromised performance sedan, but with a starting price of $75,795 and unproven Alfa Romeo reliability, we are skeptical about it gaining value.

2017 Audi TT RS

2017 Audi TT RS

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2017 Audi TT RS. The Audi TT RS is a fun little sports car oddball. It packs a turbocharged inline-5 under its rounded hood. With 400 horsepower and 354 pound-feet of torque flowing through the standard quattro all-wheel-drive system, it can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds, and a Dynamic Plus package ups the top speed from 155 to 174 mph. The car isn't balanced, but a healthy helping of easily controlled lift-off oversteer makes a joy on a track. Will it be a collectible? A check of low-mile 2012-2013 TT RSs shows pricing in the low $40,000 range. Decent, but not exactly the cornerstone of a portfolio.

2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

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2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. This generation of the Camaro is the best yet. It has progressed to the point where we are comfortable calling it a sports car. And now, Chevy is introducing the most powerful Camaro of all time, the 650-hp ZL1. It can dispatch the 0-60 mph run in 3.5 seconds and slay the quarter mile in 11.4 seconds. With a starting price around $63,435, that's certainly a formula for collectibility. However, a check of the last-generation ZL1, which had a starting price around $57,000, shows prices ranging from $37,000 to $47,000 for low-mileage coupes. That shows that the value is likely to fall but stay strong.

2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2

2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2

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2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2. Chevrolet hasn't built a truck like the Colorado ZR2. The soon-to-be-released mid-size pickup boasts position-sensitive damping spool valve shocks, locking front and rear differentials, an increased ride height, and widened front and rear tracks, all for a starting price of $40,995. Add more power and it could be a mini Ford Raptor. Hagerty says the ZR2's collectability will depend on how many are produced. We suspect this feisty truck will follow the path of the Raptor and always command some type of premium on the used vehicle market.

2017 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport, yellow

2017 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport, yellow

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2017 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport. There is no arguing that the Corvette is a performance bargain and the best balance of price and performance is the Grand Sport. It starts at $66,445 and puts up outrageous performance numbers: 0-60 mph in 3.6 seconds and an 11.8 second quarter-mile time. Take it to a road course, and it has genuine track capability, too. Expect the Grand Sport to follow the typical Corvette value curve, with an initial drop followed by a rebound some years down the road. The Grand Sport performance equipment will always keep its prices higher than standard Corvettes.


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