2017 Infiniti Q60 Red Sport first drive review: truth in truth Page 3


More red, less sport

If the performance isn’t a hint, the interior is a dead giveaway. The Q60 is about luxury first.

Soft, beautiful hides adorn the interior like a vastly more expensive German ride. In our first test car, a deep shade of blue that Infiniti calls Iridium Blue was embellished with Gallery White leather seats in a shocking shade of ivory. Red leather with the same Iridium Blue, like our afternoon car, looks downright devastating.

Infiniti’s attention to the quilting pattern and layout pays off here: it’s a far cry from the dark G37 and a much better experience than that car.

It’s not hard to find a comfortable seating position for the driver, but we’d ask rear seat passengers to move to the other side—or maybe find a comfortable bus?

The coupe’s generously sized windows make for a bright and spacious cabin—opting for white hides only underscores its spaciousness.

2017 Infiniti Q60

2017 Infiniti Q60

Enlarge Photo
2017 Infiniti Q60

2017 Infiniti Q60

Enlarge Photo
2017 Infiniti Q60

2017 Infiniti Q60

Enlarge Photo

The layout is undeniably symmetrical, but most vital functions have been placed closer to the driver. Infiniti’s frustrating dual-screen layout remains in the Q60; the top 8.0-inch touchscreen relays navigation, infotainment, and some car setup information, but the bottom 7.0-inch touchscreen controls more of the car’s setup and customization options. The bottom screen is crisp and sharp, clearly a new addition for Infiniti; the top screen’s resolution isn’t the same and is deeply in need of an update.

One quibble: A rocker switch near the shifter lets the driver choose between Eco, Comfort, Sport, and Sport+ settings, same as the bottom touchscreen when you enter the Driver Mode Selection setup. While the rocker switch only toggles between four setup modes, the touchscreen boasts an endlessly complicated 336 possible variations for the Q60 Red Sport—death by possibilities. However, we noticed that switching one setup didn’t affect the other—setting the rocker’s “Driver Mode Selection” to Sport+ didn’t change any of the “Driver Mode Selection” settings in the touchscreen below. We asked Infiniti engineers if we found a bug, or if the two settings controlled different aspects of the car (despite having the same name) but didn’t receive much of an answer.

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Even with that question, the Q60’s best solution is a softer suspension setup. Even with staggered-size 19-inchers filling out most of the wheel arches, the Q60’s softest rates soak up road imperfections without relaying much drama on the inside. Road noise is fairly well isolated, and the Q60’s generous stability and control systems step in quicker than the V-chip. 

That adds up to a cruiser that’s better suited for open stretches than narrow corners.

But don’t take my word for it. Just look at the Q60 Red Sport’s entry price, north of $52,000 and easily approaching $60,000—it’s far more serious about its luxury potential.

And it’s not lying.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misstated the overall weight of the 2017 Infiniti Q60 Red Sport. Its curb weight this year is 3,862 pounds.


 
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