Advertisement

Scion's FR-S Sport Coupe Won't Get Turbo Option: Report


2013 Scion FR-S

2013 Scion FR-S

Enlarge Photo
Bad news, sports fans: if you’re looking for a factory-built Scion FR-S turbo, word is that no such animal is forthcoming, at least in the United States market.

The problem, as Car and Driver points out, is cost. The Scion FR-S was designed specifically to sell in the mid-$20k range in the United States market. Such pricing is meant to appeal to younger buyers on a limited budget, making the Scion FR-S a “reverse halo” car for the brand.

With the strong Japanese yen and weak U.S. dollar, a turbocharged Scion FR-S would need to sell near the $30,000 price point, and Scion believes that’s simply too much money to attract the quantity of buyers needed to make the car profitable. Sadly, the option of an FR-S turbo in other markets isn’t off the table.

Subaru could potentially get away with a turbocharged BRZ, since it’s priced its base version higher, aimed at a different consumer than the Scion FR-S. That’s not to say that Subaru will definitely go the forced-induction route, since earlier reports had Subaru working on a normally-aspirated BRZ STI.

If there’s good news for Scion FR-S buyers, it’s this: the automaker has confirmed that HKS is developing a supercharger kit, and it may potentially be resold through Toyota dealers under the TRD brand. If the HKS kit fits the Scion FR-S, chances are better than average that it will fit the Subaru BRZ, too.

By this year’s SEMA show, you can expect to see plenty of other bolt-on horsepower options, too. We promise to bring you more details on go-fast parts for the FR-S and BRZ as soon as they’re available.
Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (2)
  1. I have read somewhere else that because of the engines placement to acheive the weight distribution, it's not even possible to fit a turbo. It's too far back, and too low. They would have to change the way the engine mounts in the car, destroying it's low center of gravity. Even mounting a supercharger is going to be a challenge. If it can be done I would probably buy one. As of now 200 HP is just too little power to weight ratio for me.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  2. @Lamar, from what I've heard, mounting an intercooler is also part of the problem. Expect the aftermarket to solve this without the need to reposition the engine.

    On the other hand, I like Subaru's idea of building a normally aspirated STI version, too.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement

Take Us With You!

 
Advertisement
Advertisement

Research New Cars

Go!

Related Used Listings

Browse used listings in your area.

 
© 2014 MotorAuthority. All Rights Reserved. MotorAuthority is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by izmo, Inc. Send us feedback.