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Report: Alfa Romeo Giulia Coming In 2011

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2009 Alfa Romeo 159

2009 Alfa Romeo 159

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Fans of Italian styling are anxiously awaiting Fiat and Alfa Romeo's return to the U.S. now that the alliance deal between the Italian auto giant and Chrysler has been signed. Late this year we will see the first of the Italian runabouts, the minuscule Fiat 500, and after that there are the Alfa Romeo MiTo and upcoming Milano hatchbacks, though neither of these vehicles have been confirmed for U.S. sale.

The reason being is that Americans still haven't fully embraced the concept of the hatchback as a useful and practical vehicle for families, and nowhere is this truer than in the luxury segment. BMW and Mercedes-Benz both make premium small cars, but neither sells the hatch versions in the U.S. And so it appears Alfa Romeo may follow a similar line of business logic, with the latest reports indicating the Giulia sedan--a replacement to the European 159 (pictured)--may be the first high-volume Alfa Romeo to return to U.S. shores.

The new Alfa Romeo Giulia sedan is reportedly set to be revealed next year for the European market, while Americans will have to wait an additional year. According to Fiat-Chrysler CEO, Sergio Marchionne, the Alfa Romeo brand isn’t likely to arrive in the U.S. until 2012, when local production of the Giulia--and a Chrysler model based on the same platform--starts up.

Based on Fiat Group’s new “Compact-Wide” platform, the front-wheel drive Giulia will feature a McPherson front axle with a twin-link rear suspension. A high-performance all-wheel drive variant may also be offered, as well as a sporty wagon.

The question, however, remains: how do Chrysler and Alfa Romeo build cars on a common platform while maintaining sufficiently independent brand identities while also being competitive in their segments and profitable at the same time?

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Comments (11)
  1. "The question, however, remains: how do Chrysler and Alfa Romeo build the car to share a platform while maintaining sufficiently independent brand identities while also being competitive in their segments and profitable at the same time?"
    Oh, I dunno - How did Saab and Alfa Romeo do the exact same thing in the 80's/90's with the Saab 9000 and Alfa Romeo 164?
     
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  2. Correct. The Fiat Croma and Lancia Thema were also based on the same platform, but they looked much more like the 9000 than the 164 did.
     
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  3. That's my point Adam - The Croma and Thema used the exact same bodyshell as the 9000 (tho I'm not certain that they were as successful in their market segments as the Saab and Alfa)
    Sharing platforms while maintaining brand differentiation is no longer a big hurdle - Look at the Phaeton/Bentley Continental/A8, A6/A4/Passat/Superb, Golf/Jetta/A3/TT/Leon/Toledo/Octavia, BMW 7-Series/RR Ghost, Volvo C30/S40/V50/EuroFocus/Mazda3...
     
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  4. VISIT Alfa Romeo Mito GTA - Official Launch Video
     
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  5. ALFA ROMEO HA UN ' ANIMA!!!!
    ciaooooooooo
     
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  6. Right, the Croma and Thema were not huge successes, though the limited edition Ferrari V8-powered Thema 8.32 made me laugh. The Golf examples above have perhaps stretched the limits of what you can do on one platform without cannibalizing sales, but I agree with your premise that the Europeans have a pretty strong track record in this regard. PSA does well with Peugeot and Citroen too.
     
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  7. I don't care what platform it is. Make it look and drive like an Alfa and I will buy it. Send it soon = I'll even buy a hatchback Mito. It's been too long.
     
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  8. adamk and bepsf, are you guys serious? Do you even have a clue? In that era, the Fiat Croma and Lancia Thema were two of the most successful mid-size family cars for the group. The Fiat Croma i.e. Turbo and Lancia Thema 8.32 were much admired; nothing to laugh at. The Alfa Romeo 164 was styled by Pininfarina, and the Fiat Croma, Lancia Thema, and Saab 9000 were all styled by Giugiaro-Italdesign; all wonderful looking cars when they came out. All four were well ahead of the Japanese and American blandness of the time. They shared a lot of components, but not the complete body shell... Oh, why am I bothering educating.. :]
     
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  9. Alfa is coming to America again? Last I heard they were under the microscop as a brand to be axed because of weak sales.
     
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  10. Alfa Romeo certainly take the cake in style, now it must be bulletproof and able to handle big city potholes and it'll be a huge success! Beautiful expression of one's independence while going down the road!
     
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  11. I am amazed at the range of Alfa designs nowadays. They looks incredibly good compared to years ago during the time of 33, 164 etc... As for Thema, dunno about the US but I know it sure was a popular model way back.
     
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