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Tesla roadster goes 241 miles on a single charge - while rallying

 

2008 tesla roadster motorauthority 001

The car's materials costs had previously exceeded its list price by tens of thousands of dollars

The car's materials costs had previously exceeded its list price by tens of thousands of dollars

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One of the biggest criticisms of electric vehicles is the limited driving range they offer when compared with conventional diesel and petrol powered cars. However, the belief that driving an electric vehicle will leave you stranded after a couple dozen miles is starting to lose credibility, fast.

Take the all-electric Tesla Roadster for example. The car managed to travel 241 miles on a single charge during an 'Alternative Energies' rally in Monte Carlo, giving it the honor of being the only electric vehicle to finish the event without having to top up its batteries.

The Rallye Monte Carlo d'Energies Alternatives, an annual event that sees a slew of around 80 vehicles using LPG, E85, hybrid and electric power take each other on, was the setting for the impressive run. A number of other electric vehicles also took place, including some Mitsubishi i-MiEVs and a Ruf-modified Porsche 911 EV, but in the end the Tesla managed to stick out the entire race without having to stop.

The race began on Saturday morning, a little after 7AM, at which point the Tesla's battery gauge was showing it had enough juice to go 246 miles - barely enough to complete the race. The race rules require drivers to maintain an average speed of between 28 and 31mph across the entire stage - which means the drivers had to avoid heavy acceleration and keep a steady speed. Winning the race for Tesla was paramount, so much so that the Tesla crew even skipped having a lunch stop and reportedly conducted toilet breaks with Formula 1 efficiency.

In the end, the car managed to make it to the finish line with juice to spare - around 38 miles worth in fact. This means that the Tesla had a theoretical range of around 280 miles - far greater than the company's own estimates of 220 miles. While the event was more of a hypermiling marathon than a race, Tesla claims that driven hard, the Roadster would still be able to travel around 120 miles before its battery was totally discharged.
Via: LeBlogAuto

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Comments (6)
  1. When I drove it (hard) the guage seemed to drop rather quickly, but that's true of any car.
    With a new battery technology (such a Boron-Air) with the energy density of gasoline, perhaps amazing things can be accomplished soon...
     
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  2. I'm still on the fence about how the energy storage will work on future EVs... theres a pretty big battle waging right now about developing batteries further, finding new battery chemistries, or working on advanced capacitors.

    see you end up with a couple problems here: batteries are heavy because most rechargeable batteries are wet and metallic. and they dont store nearly as much energy as gasoline. plus they're inefficient at rapid charge and discharge (because they heat up, that heat is wasted energy). new chemistries could take care of that, but highly doubtful.

    capacitors on the other hand are nearly 100% efficient (so long as you dont hit them with a higher voltage than theyre rated for, they will never damage, have millions of charge cycles, and can charge and discharge with huge amounts of power without ever heating) but the problem with them is they carry even less energy than the batteries do. but to give you an idea, I'm holding in my hand right now a capacitor that is the size of a pop can, weighs 1 lbs, and holds a little over 17 hp. a 17 hp pop can. but it can only do that 17hp for half a minute and its done.

    where does the future go? who wants to place bets?
     
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  3. Until they develop a way to "refill" the battery as quick as filling up a gas tank, I think I'll stick with gas as my choice of fuel for my vehicle and leave electricity to power my lawnmower and weed whacker.
     
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  4. Chris- I'll bite and my bet is on diesel or hydrogen. Electrics will go the way of the Do Do just as they did 100 years ago!

    Although if they do work I'm going to invest in a body shop! Why? Becasuse there is going to be a boat load of scratched and damaged paint from folks who pull out of their drive way in the morning without unplugging their car..
     
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  5. My idea is that a "refueling station" has an underground storage for battery packs. You drive your vehicle over an area where a machine takes the spent batteries out, and pops fresh ones back in. If you have an Expedition, you get 10, if you have a Miata you get 2. They are all the same size, like a giant D cell.
    Ahh, would require a lot of infrastructure though. Someday...
     
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  6. I always find it amusing when people give credebility to the entertainment show Top Gear. The show that flips cars ower cliffs and fires RPG:s at them. And if I recall correctly, the show where the Tesla appeard they showed an experimental hydrogen car and said that hydrogen was the future. Seriously? Come on, Top Gear might be hilariously funny, but they are not a great source of unbiased information.
     
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