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Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

A tribute to Shelby

Dan Jones will tell you he became an aircraft mechanic because the automotive class was full. While his day job for 37 years was working on United Airlines planes, his passion and hobby always has been cars. He’s owned Fords most of his life except for one 1955 Chevy sedan, which turned out to be a lemon. Despite not proclaiming to be a Ford family, all three of his kids have owned Mustangs.

“I wanted the Mustang when it first came out, but at the time needed a family car,” he recalled. “The Mustang simply wasn’t a family car, and I settled for a Galaxie.”

DON'T MISS: Ford Mustang iconology: Pony car's ups and downs

Eventually he got a Mustang, a 1965 coupe he bought in the early ‘70s.

In 1980, he bought a second ‘65 coupe and drove it to work, then sold it to his son, who drove it another nine years before he parked it at Dan’s house. There the Mustang sat—for 18 years—until his son told him to do whatever he wanted with it.

Dan remembered a black and gold GT350-H sitting in the Hertz parking lot at work. He embarked on a restoration, turning his coupe into a Hertz tribute.

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

Dan Jones' 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car

“I disassembled it and then my friend at Horseshoe Restoration needed help in his shop,” he recalled. “He convinced me to help him wrench on cars and in return he would help put the car back together and provide parts.”

After 20 years, he finished his 1966 Hertz GT350 Shelby tribute car.

To him, the black and gold paint shines like no other Mustang. Dan doesn’t even care much for the modern versions of the pony car. The ‘60s Mustangs were the ideal size; today’s bigger Mustangs are “out of that range.”

Everyone should own a Mustang, Dan says, “because the Mustang is a car all its own.” And he doesn’t worry that one day the car will go away, even if the rest of the car world goes electric.

“It’ll always be there,” he said.

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

A huffing horse

Trevor Simons can’t even remember how he became an automotive enthusiast. He’ll tell you he can remember when his dad had a 1970 Plymouth Barracuda with a 340 cubic-inch V-8 and 4-speed transmission. After school Trevor would head to the garage to learn as he worked beside his dad, turning wrenches on restoration projects. He’s not a Ford guy per se, he’s a car guy.

Financial troubles drove Trevor to part with a 1977 Datsun 280Z turbo build. After he was back on his feet, he bought a 1986 Honda Rebel 450. While wrenching on the bike Trevor discovered it was actually bike No. 71 of a two-year run.

An inoperable 1966 Mustang crossed his path on Craigslist, and after a game of let’s-make-a-deal, Trevor ended up with a blue horse that needed some attention.

“Over time I’ve been turning the car into a monster turbo build,” he says.

It’s evident by the twin 57 snails mounted off the engine huffing 12 psi. The CX Racing intercooler does little to hide the horse’s newly modified heart.

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Trevor Simons' 1966 Ford Mustang twin-turbo build

Despite galloping the earth for 52 years, Trevor is quick to point out “the car’s still all factory steel, and it has the original factory trunk tag on it.” The tag is a faded, crumpled reminder of the car's heritage and the color it originally had leaving the assembly line.

"The factory silver on it, it just means something," he says.

Trevor says everyone should own a Mustang someday “because they are fun.” He doesn’t think the Mustang will ever go away.

“It has too much heritage to end, just like Porsche heritage, and how Nissan bought back the Z.”


 
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