How Lamborghini evolved from the LM002 to the Urus Page 2


The interior stems from a similar thought process. Designers received a memo saying the passengers (especially the driver) need to feel like they’re sitting in a Lamborghini. That’s relatively simple to achieve in a two-seater whose pistons sing six inches behind the occupants’ ears, but it’s considerably more difficult to pin down when designing an SUV.

You sit low in the Urus, much lower than in its British cousin, the Bentley Bentayga. The seats are firm, and the slanted center console echoes the Huracán and Aventador models. The digital instrument cluster looks familiar, too, though it encapsulates new features like a turbo boost gauge and an inclinometer. If you need an inclinometer in an Aventador you’ve either taken leave of your senses or maneuvered yourself into an eye-wateringly expensive situation. The Urus is different; Lamborghini hopes that some Urus owners will venture off the pavement to explore a different side of the brand’s ethos and put the four-wheel-drive hardware to the test.

2019 Lamborghini Urus

2019 Lamborghini Urus

Enlarge Photo
2019 Lamborghini Urus

2019 Lamborghini Urus

Enlarge Photo
2019 Lamborghini Urus

2019 Lamborghini Urus

Enlarge Photo

The tamburo ("drum" in Italian) selector on the center console lets the driver pick which driving mode best suits the conditions under the 23-inch wheels. Snow, dirt, and sand are on the menu, as are street, sport, and race. Reggiani noted the 650-horsepower twin-turbocharged V-8 engine excels in all of the aforementioned conditions, and explained this versatility is the main reason why the Urus doesn’t offer the naturally aspirated 10- and 12-cylinder engines that form Lamborghini’s backbone. We suspect cost and fuel economy entered the equation, too. It’s safe to bet we’ll see additional variants join the line-up in the coming years (a plug-in hybrid is almost certain, but how about a Urus Superveloce?), but don’t wait for the V12-powered model to place your order because it’s not happening.

Doubling up

Doubling Lamborghini’s annual production required doubling the size of its factory, including the workforce and, consequently, the parking lot and the cafeteria. While employees build the Aventador on the same line that founder Ferruccio Lamborghini inaugurated in 1963, and the Huracán under the same roof, the Urus gets its own building positioned atop of what was, until late 2015, a perfectly ordinary field. The clean, well-lit facility inaugurates a novel production process where, according to Lamborghini, humans are assisted by robots but not completely replaced by them. The plant currently builds pre-production models at the rate of roughly one vehicle per day. It will produce about 23 per day when it reaches full capacity, though Lamborghini candidly admits it has enough space to expand that number if needed. No one would go on record stating how many more it can assemble, however.

Officially, there are no concrete plans to add a fourth model to the hierarchy, but our crystal ball predicts the extra capacity won’t remain untapped for very long. While we’re playing the guessing game, how about a front-engined, four-seat coupe in the vein of the Espada? It wouldn’t be sacrilege as the heritage is undeniably there, and the Urus shows Lamborghini knows how (and, importantly, when) to draw on past models to grow the brand.

—Ronan Glon


 
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