2017 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet first drive review: the one you want Page 2


You could more or less build a 911 Carrera S up to these specs. But at $134,050 for the GTS droptop, it’s around $16,000 cheaper than a similarly optioned S.  

Rarely does a Porsche seem like a bargain, but the 911 GTS sure comes close.

Even with its sport suspension system and lower ride height, the 911’s chameleon-like ability to transition from grand tourer to sports car remains fully intact. The GTS rides firmly, but compliance remains the name of the game. This isn’t a dedicated track-day star like a 911 GT3, but it hardly loses its composure when the wick is turned up.

The GTS’ flat-6 makes the most of its extra power. It’s easy to be thrown off by the fact that the now-all-turbo 911 lineup delivers all of its 405 pound-feet of torque at 2,150 rpm before tapering off at 5,000 rpm. Whereas driving a 911 used to be about revving its motor all the way to redline, acceleration is instant in any gear at just about any speed now. It's more usable in the real world, but maybe not quite as rich in character.

2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

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2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

Enlarge Photo
2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS, Lake Tahoe

Enlarge Photo

With Sport mode selected to tighten up the suspension even further, the GTS gleefully carved its way through Nevada’s silver country. I drove the coupe briefly, but, frankly, with the top raised, the Cabriolet isn’t noticeably louder. Only slightly reduced over-the-shoulder visibility with the top raised serves as a reminder from inside that you’re driving the sunny day version of the 911 GTS. Drop the thickly insulated top and press another button to raise its wind blocker and it’s possible to have normal voice conversation at speeds approaching triple digits while still soaking up the rays.

Even the Alcantara sports seats, which only offer limited power adjustment as standard (hey, it saves weight!), are perfect for a droptop. Their surfaces don’t get nearly as hot as shiny hides.

Porsche says about half of all GTS buyers will opt for the hardtop, which is marginally stiffer and certainly more oriented toward the occasional track day outing with a sports car club. Around a third will go for the Cabriolet, with the remaining buyers snapping up the all-wheel drive-only Targa.

If there’s a lingering question in my mind, it remains centered around the 911 Carrera S. Given the GTS’ blend of precision and compliance, not to mention its relative value, the S begins to feel like the odd 911 out. It’s a good problem to have for Porsche, that’s for sure. 

Porsche provided travel and lodging to Internet Brands Automotive to bring you this firsthand report.


 
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