3 automakers took different roads to same destination: a supercar Page 2


The Zerouno also uses the same chassis as the Huracán(also owned by Audi), and an all carbon-fiber body that was spearheaded by Chief Technical Officer Antonio Casu who, before taking the reigns at Italdesign, worked for—yup, Audi.

Although the Zerouno and the Huracánshare roughly similar dimensions and a powertrain layout, not much else from the Italdesign car is off-the-shelf. The production of all five examples of the Zerouno will be in Italdesign's Moncalieri, Italy, factory—not Germany. Most of the interiors and exterior schemes will be built-to-order for those buyers, except for a track-only Corsa model.

The price for a Zerouno: $1.6 million. That's a lot more than an Audi or even a Lambo.

Ruf CTR

The "Yellow Bird" homage goes it alone, well almost. Although the body borrows heavily from Porsche design, the 2017 Ruf CTR is its own car—the first from Porsche specialists Ruf.

Unlike the Zerouno and the A110, the 2017 Ruf CTR started from scratch. The carbon-fiber, rear-engined monocoque chassis is the world's first and will be built specifically for Ruf. Ruf didn't have the expertise to develop its own platform, so it worked with the Berlin engineering firm Vela Performance to design the carbon fiber monocoque.

The 700-horsepower, twin-turbo 3.6-liter flat-6 is Ruf's own, developed from the 997 block. The 6-speed manual transmission comes from ZF, but is geared for the CTR's top speed of 225 mph.

2017 Ruf CTR

2017 Ruf CTR

Enlarge Photo
2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

Enlarge Photo
2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

Enlarge Photo

ZF also produced the coil-over dampers for the CTR, as well as the inboard horizontally opposed dampers that are plainly visible from the rear window and won't be found on any Porsche.

Alois Ruf, Jr. told us recently that the 2017 Ruf CTR wasn't an aberration for the company that has specialized in tuning Porsches since the 1960s.

“We will make spinoffs and similar cars in the future because we believe that there is the potential that it can be built in very limited numbers every year and there will be buyers for it,” Ruf said.

All 30 production versions of the CTR were sold by the end of the Geneva auto show for roughly $800,000 a piece—a small sum considering the great amount of effort it takes to build a car from the ground up.

“Now we are a little bit overwhelmed. We have a big list and we have to figure it out,” Ruf told us.


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