Here's how the 2017 Ruf CTR 'Yellow Bird' homage flies Page 2


Ruf worked with the Berlin firm Vela Performance to design the architecture for the 2017 CTR. It is a carbon fiber tub with an integrated steel tubular roll cage to provide the top structure.

The body panels are carbon fiber as well. Ruf Automobile doesn’t have the expertise or the loom to lay out the carbon fiber and the company is in the process of negotiating with subcontractors to determine which company will do that work.

Steel subframes also provide the front and rear crash structures and provide mounting points for the suspension components.

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

Enlarge Photo
2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

Enlarge Photo
2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

Enlarge Photo

Those suspensions are double wishbone units with pushrods and horizontal mounted shock absorbers and coil-over springs. These are longitudinally mounted in the front and transverse mounted in the rear. “It’s a DNA from all the LeMans cars,” Ruf said.

Open the engine cover and you can see the in-board mounted dampers on top of the engine in the rear.

Ruf is sourcing the coil-over dampers from ZF, as well as the limited-slip differential, anti-lock braking system, and electronic stability control/traction control system. Ruf says the electronic nannies can be turned off completely. “It’s a very analog car," he noted.

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Very modern wheels, tires, and brakes sit at all four corners. The brakes are internally vented and perforated carbon ceramic discs (just shy of 15 inches in diameter up front and 13.4 inches in the rear) with 6-piston front calipers and 4-piston rear clamps. For rolling stock, Ruf chose forged aluminum, center-locking 19-inch wheels from long-time partner OZ and shod them with 245/35 front and 305/30 Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires.

That’s a lot of tire under a car sized like a 964-generation Porsche 911. “We feel it’s needed to make a good lap time on the racing circuit and it’s also needed for the horsepower,” Ruf noted.

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

2017 Ruf CTR development via Vela Performance

Enlarge Photo

3.6 liters, 700 horses, 2,640 pounds dry

Ruf Automobiles didn’t need to go to an outside vendor for the engine development. The engine in the CTR is the company’s RT12, which stands for Ruf Turbo, 12th generation. Based on the 997-generation Porsche 911 Turbo engine, but made by Ruf, this 3.6-liter flat-6 features four overhead cams, two turbos that use variable turbo geometry, two intercoolers, and 17.4 psi of turbo boost. It produces 700 hp and 649 pound-feet of torque.

The engine uses dry sump lubrication to handle cornering forces on a track without oil starvation.

Again, Ruf worked with ZF for the transmission. It is a 6-speed manual, and Mr. Ruf says it is a transmission designed specially for Ruf and geared for the car’s 225 mph top speed.

2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

2017 Ruf CTR, Geneva Motor Show

Enlarge Photo

All told, the car comes in at just 2,640 pounds dry, giving it a weight ratio of 3.5 pounds per horsepower.

Some preliminary performance figures are in, but Ruf is still in the process of testing the lone prototype.

Ruf says the car meets his target of accelerating from 0 to 200 kph (124 mph) in under 9 seconds. The 0 to 60 mph time of 3.5 seconds is a byproduct of that.

We imagine some other impressive performance numbers will come soon, perhaps even a Nürburgring time.


 
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