How can we make auto racing an Olympic sport? Subaru has an idea Page 2


His entry speed should be somewhere above 40 mph, but below 60 mph. Entry into the corner will immediately scrub about 5 mph from his speed—not to mention the impact and physical forces that could cause him to temporarily blackout.

"I'll have a sore neck tomorrow, that's for sure," said Higgins.

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Enlarge Photo

Hold my beer

Bad ideas should die at birth, but zombies always attract attention.

Ian Richardson is a British bobsledder who started formulating the plan a few years ago and found a couple willing participants to initially sign on to his admittedly dangerous idea of sending a car down a bobsled track. Those eventually balked at the cost, or lacked the intestinal fortitude to get the mayor of St. Moritz, the bobsled club, and common sense to simultaneously sign off  to make it happen.

"When you have some ears, people say 'We can do that.' But when they look at it, they immediately say, 'How in the bloody hell will it work?'" Richardson said.

Subaru signed on in January with all the necessary elements. Widening the track by a foot-and-a-half to accommodate the car seemed easy compared to the paperwork, inspections, and demands needed for it to work. For example, Higgins' car couldn't exceed a decibel limit imposed by the town, as if ear drums were the only thing at risk.

"I think it's fair to say that this is the first time in living memory someone has even tried anything like this," Richardson said.

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Enlarge Photo

Coincidentally, Richardson was a brakeman as a bobsledder, but his job for the last three years has been to add speed to his plan to send a car down St. Moritz, easily one of the fastest tracks in the world. The track is so fast because it's cold, he said, but warmer weather delayed the Horseshoe run until the last afternoon of the last day for filming.

A practice run pinballed Higgins' car and knocked out a wall just before the entry into Horseshoe corner. Instead of carrying speed around the course, Higgins would have to roll slowly into the corner, cross his fingers, then hammer the throttle harder than a rusty nail. Neon dots along the wall indicated his ideal line around the bend, but even he visualized that the run up the side of the wall could be dicey.

CHECK OUT: 2017 Subaru BRZ: Playing in Spain

"My biggest concern was speed around the corner to get the shot," he said.

As the car approached the entry of the corner, a flurry of speed preceded a spray of snow. The front passenger-side rail dug deeply into the ice wall around Horseshoe and scoured the wall near his marks.

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Enlarge Photo

Compression in the shocks dug in the studded tires so deeply that the track was being irrigated at 45 mph. As Higgins rocketed around the corner, he dipped into the center of the track before careening up the wall. His exit line left the car in a position that was unlikely to right itself before the track flattened out.

Thankfully, a wall that had been extended from the corner was built precisely for when luck runs out and talent takes over. Higgins and his Subaru exited the final corner with two wheels on terra firma, teetering helplessly toward finishing the run on the driver's side door. As the roof mashed toward the right side of the wall, Higgins righted the ship onto all four wheels to finish the corner, shiny side up, and cheers belting through the radio.

"I always knew I'd be a passenger on the exit, because it comes off quite sharp," he said. "If we rattled down the side, it's OK. When the car has been built like it has, I have all the confidence in the world I'd be OK."

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Subaru STI in St. Moritz

Enlarge Photo

Meet Mark Higgins, the only man who thought throwing a Subaru-turned-bobsled down a legendary run would turn out OK.


 
Follow Us

Take Us With You!

 


 
© 2017 MotorAuthority. All Rights Reserved. MotorAuthority is published by Internet Brands Automotive Group. Stock photography by izmostock. Read our Cookie Policy.