2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP 580-2 first drive review: 2 is greater than 4 Page 2

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From the first corner, carrying in just a bit too much speed, trail braking the car and giving a flick to the wheel to initiate rotation, then standing on the gas, I was a convert. I proceeded to spend the next four laps laughing like a loon and doing things that would probably get me—and you—kicked out of a normal track day. All with perfect control and a surprising amount of freedom. The system knows how much slip angle the car can take, and gives it to you, letting the car thrash its rear Pirelli P Zero Corsas and hold a smooth drift past the apex and onto the straight. Unwind the wheel and keep your foot down and you slingshot to the next corner. Rinse and repeat.

Again, this is Lamborghini doing more with less—less intrusion, less nannying, less concern for the tight-and-tidy precision of ultimate pace. Instead you get more sideways, more fun, and much more of an idea what the car will ultimately do, and how it will behave, at the limit. Sure, it’s helping you out, controlling the drift. And the system will give you enough rope to spin the car, too (though I thankfully avoided that—narrowly).

But after two sessions of thrashing the car as sideways and ham-fistedly as possible, I struck out on another speed run for my final session. Thanks to an enabling Lamborghini hot-shoe as lead driver, the pace was very brisk indeed. With the rear-drive Huracán back in Corsa mode, I felt confident matching his entry speeds, clipping the apex, and getting back to the gas. Here, I learned that as well as being a hoon-tastic vehicle for silly, stupid fun, the new LP 580-2 is also a fine-tuned weapon for laser-sharp precision.

2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

Enlarge Photo
2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

Enlarge Photo
2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

2016 Lamborghini Huracán LP580-2

Enlarge Photo

Again, I trail brake into the corner, inducing just enough yaw to point the car down to the apex, allowing me to unwind the wheel early and get back to the throttle. The stability control system and 3D sensors are now tuned for maximum pace, letting me pin the throttle and get just the right amount of yaw on the way out of the corner, too—a feeling very close to that found in the brilliant PTM Mode 5 Track setting in the Corvette ZR1. It’s a buttoned-down, controlled version of the controlled drift I got in Sport mode, but having familiarized myself with the car’s balance and behaviors just over the limit, I’m much more confident in driving right up to that limit without going over. The whole machine works in harmony.

The difference from the all-wheel-drive LP 610-4 is marked. While that machine, too, is a fine track day weapon, easily the best Lamborghini that had been built to date in that regard, the new LP 580-2 is even better—ultimate pace be damned. Better steering, zero chassis-induced understeer, and plenty of power even for the jaded supercar elite, the rear-drive Huracán is simply more engaging and more rewarding to drive well.

For the driver looking to not only enjoy their supercar on track, but also to improve their own ability to approach the car’s true limits, the new LP 580-2 is the perfect tool—and the perfect toy. Even if it is the cheapest one on the billionaire’s playground.


 
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