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2013 Lincoln MKZ Configurator And Pricing Estimator Goes Live


Lincoln’s 2013 MKZ sedan is still a few months away from hitting the market, but Ford’s luxury division is curious to hear from interested potential buyers before it releases official pricing and specifications.

Following the lead of automakers like Hyundai, who released tentative 2012 Azera pricing to solicit feedback prior to finalizing specifications, Lincoln has put up a configurator site for the 2013 MKZ sedan. While the prices shown may not be what ultimately appears on the window sticker, they're certainly in the ballpark.

According to Lincoln, the MKZ range will start at the MKZ Premier, expected to be priced at $36,800 including a destination charge of $875. That money buys you a 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine, front-wheel-drive, SYNC with MyLincoln Touch, leather-trimmed seating, active noise control, Continuously Controlled Damping and keyless entry.

In other words, even base versions come surprisingly well-equipped, although we’re not sure how many buyers will find the 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder up to the task of accelerating the midsize sedan. Fortunately, even entry-level MKZ buyers can opt for the 3.7-liter V-6 if they’re willing to spring for the added cost.

Next in the range is the MKZ Select, which begins at $37,900 including destination charge, followed by the Reserve ($39,950), Preferred with Single Panel Moonroof ($43,330) and Preferred with Retractable Panoramic Roof ($45,125).

Five variants of each trim level are available, including the 2.0-liter EcoBoost FWD, the 2.0-liter EcoBoost AWD, the 3.7-liter V-6 FWD, the 3.7-liter V-6 AWD and the 2.0-liter Hybrid, available in FWD only. Before customers begin adding options, that’s an expensive 25 configurations that Ford (and Lincoln dealers) need to contend with.

At the high end of the pricing scale, a loaded MKZ Preferred with Retractable Panoramic Roof, the 3.7-liter V-6, AWD and every option box checked will only tip the scales at $53,745, pricing the MKZ comfortably below its competition from Germany and Japan.

The 2013 Lincoln MKZ is a better-looking car than the model it replaces, too, at least in our eyes. Will that be enough to draw buyers back into Lincoln showrooms? We’ll know by the end of the year.
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Comments (13)
  1. $44K for any kind of sunroof?
    Lincoln are out of their minds.
     
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  2. @Brian, it looks like you can order a single panel moonroof for $1,200 on Select-level MKZs. That means a sunroof-equipped MKZ would only cost $39,100.
     
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  3. Thanks for clarifying that - That's confusing.
    Seems to be a lot of trim levels and powertrain options - IMO, there should simply be powertrain choices, each with an extensive options list (like BMW or Mercedes).
    Meanwhile, the color choices are horrendous: Ginger Ale looks like Phlegm. Two reds, two whites and two greys - but you have to order a Hybrid to get a Blue, and you can't get the brown interior with red or blue? It's just bizarre.
     
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  4. @Brian, it's also possible that Lincoln is putting all these configurations in front of customers pre-launch to see what the most popular variants and colors are. If they try to bring the MKZ to market with this many different available builds, I don't see them making money.
     
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  5. get rid of the front and do a redesign that actually looks good, that competes with the rest of the big guys ill gladly buy one. But to me Lincoln is in a loosing battle they need some fresh minds. their product are just not appealing to the buyers.only thing i like about this care is the rear.
     
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  6. @Enzo, I see the real problem in the number of configurable variants. Twenty-five possible base builds, before you begin adding options, is simply insane. If the MKZ comes to market like this, I can't see how Lincoln will build them at a profit.
     
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  7. its sad to see cause i actually want to see a American luxury company excluding Cadillac being able to compete.i dont know whats wrong with the people in charge of Lincoln.
     
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  8. regardless of how dog ugle that front end is. if they made more of the options as standard and kep the proce static, then there would be less versions needing to be made and more underlying profit.
     
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  9. @WizardsLore, exactly - less configurations equal more profit. That's one reason why Honda, VW and Hyundai are all doing so well.
     
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  10. @ Kurt, the idea of stop trying to please everybody and make the car that will appease everybody just hasnt sunk in with them it seems !
     
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  11. Dead before it even landed? I don't see how this can compete with the ATS. Lincoln were boasting all the tech it would have, but the ATS already trumps it with its CUE interface and magnetic ride. Plus the ATS is on a unique rear-wheel drive platform - it ain't no gussied up Chevy. WAKE UP FORD!
     
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  12. Lincoln has a hit on their hands with this one! This new MKZ is a unique looking vehicle that says class and luxury at a very good price point considering the competition.
     
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  13. Is there any luxury car maker other than Lincoln that does not have a coupe?
     
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