Advertisement

Moreau On The Mend From Le Mans Testing Accident


Guillaume Moreau continues to recover - Photo courtesy OAK Racing

Guillaume Moreau continues to recover - Photo courtesy OAK Racing

Enlarge Photo

OAK Racing LMP1 driver Guillaume Moreau continues to recover from the significant accident he incurred on the Le Mans Test Day June 3; the driver's twelfth vertebra was fractured, forcing two surgeries to stabilize his back.

This week Moreau transferred from the Angers hospital to Arche, a rehabilitation center in Le Mans that specializes in spinal injuries. With both operations considered a success and his fracture stabilized and spinal compression relieved, Moreau has already recovered significant movement in his legs, which is an encouraging sign for his future.

This next step and assignment to Arche allows the driver to enter a stage of rehabilitation where an initial three-month phase is being conducted so the specialists on-site can fully evaluate his level of final recovery.

"I was cared for remarkably well by the Angers hospital over the course of more than two weeks," Moreau confirmed. "While I had little memory of the first operation, the second proved quite tough physically. I am happy to be taking the next step, one of rehabilitation, where I can be more active - even though I still need some rest.

"I can already move my legs, which feels good and walk aided by some support down one side," he continued. "I now need to do some physic to stimulate and strengthen my muscles as I still lack of sensitivity in my right foot. With the work I am going to be doing here at Arche, it should come back. I will have to learn to be patient, which is not my best quality."

No. 15 OAK/Pescarolo in traffic at Porsche Curves - Anne Proffit photo

No. 15 OAK/Pescarolo in traffic at Porsche Curves - Anne Proffit photo

Enlarge Photo


In his absence, the OAK/Pescarolo No. 15 LMP1 was driven by substitute Franck Montagny, Bertrand Baguette and Dominik Kraiharner during the 24 Heures du Mans. The open-cockpit car was running ninth in class as the sun rose at Le Mans before being forced into retirement with engine problems. "We thought the powerplant had found some reliability but unfortunately that wasn't the case and the car retired with a broken engine," team owner Jacques Nicolet said.

Nicolet is, of course "delighted that Guillaume is moving up a step in his recovery. It allows us to be confident for the rest of his recover as he has always held a special place within the team. The fact that he is now in Le Mans for this therapy period allows us to provide him with direct sport," Nicolet stated. "For us, he remains integral to the team, an element that without any doubt will be positive for his morale, along with all the messages of goodwill and sympathy he has received."
Posted in:
Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement

Take Us With You!

 

Get FREE Dealer Quotes

From dealers near you
Go!
Advertisement

Research New Cars

Go!


 
© 2014 MotorAuthority. All Rights Reserved. MotorAuthority is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by izmo, Inc. Send us feedback.