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Bridgestone Shows Off Puncture-Proof Airless Tire Concept

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Forget about limited mileage run-flat tires; Japanese tire giant Bridgestone has unveiled a new non-pneumatic tire concept that’s completely puncture-proof.

The key is its non-pneumatic design that does away with air entirely, with the tire instead relying on a structure of spokes for its strength and cushioning effect.

This unique structure of spokes stretches along the inner sides of the tires supporting the weight of the vehicle. There's no need to periodically refill the tires with air, meaning they require less maintenance.

At the same time, the worry of punctures is eliminated. In addition, the spoke structure within the tire is made from reusable thermoplastic resin, and along with the rubber in the tread portion, the materials used in the tires are 100 percent recyclable.

Not surprisingly, Bridgestone believes the tires will be a viable and more environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional tires in the not too distant future.

The idea of non-pneumatic tires has been around for a while. In fact, rival tire manufacturer Michelin had a similar concept back in the year 2000. However, until now such concept tires have been impractical to produce for the mass market.

The good news is that Bridgestone is currently working on this technology with the aim of practical implementation. For more details head over to our sister site All Car Tech for its extensive report.
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Comments (2)
  1. Yes they might be puncture proof but most likely in due time those thermoplastic spokes will also turn brittle, so it would be a good idea to write down on the tire wall a use-by-date.
     
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  2. Tires already have use-by dates sort of...they are stamped with date of manufacture which gives you a general idea of how long they will last. However, the lifespan of a tire as far as dry rot varies so much with how the tire is cared for that it'd be near-impossible to have an ACCURATE use-by date. The rubber would start to rot long before you'd have to worry about the spokes degrading (it'll absorb most if not all the radiation that would harm the plastics), and at that point the tires would be discarded for recycling where the carcass could be inspected and graded as safe or not for simply being retreaded. The current dating system should therefore work fine for this design.
     
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