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Ferrari Builds 200 Ton F1 Simulator

 
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Ferrari F1 Simulator

Ferrari F1 Simulator

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Ferrari has launched the ultimate driving simulator to help hone its F1 cars and drivers, but weighing in at more than 200 tons, with ten computers, five giant 3D video screens and a 3,500 watt Dolby sound system, this isn’t the type of driving game that you will find under your Christmas tree.

While Ferrari admits that no simulator can match the sensitivity and feel of an actual race car, it does allow the team to quickly test new technology and to race on new tracks without breaking the rules limiting testing in the real world.

The first virtual laps at the wheel of the simulator were driven by Andrea Bertolini, who worked with Ferrari engineers on the development of the project.

The Ferrari simulator, built with the technical support of Moog, consists of an aluminum and composite structure in which are fitted the F1 race car cockpit and the equipment which produces the images and sound.

The platform weighs around two tons by itself and is fitted with electronically controlled hydraulic actuators. The whole structure is fitted on a specially designed and built base, weighing two hundred tons and consuming up to 174 horsepower in electrical energy.

This news comes just a day after we reported that Ferrari was launching a new Driver Academy racing school to sharpen the skills of future potential F1 champions, signifying the determination Ferrari has to return to the top of motorsport’s highest echelon.

[Ferrari]

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Comments (5)
  1. If you can figure out a way to do that, you've invented artificial gravity machine. I'd suggest you to patent it very quickly..
    Of course, you can simulate it by rotation / movement of the cockpit, but only to a point in practice. By simply tilting the cockpit you can give a feeling of slight (less than 1 G) acceleration or deacceleration.
     
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  2. Would love to have a go in it. On a sidenote, anyone else see a resemblance to Sasha Baron Cohen (Ali G/ Borat/ Bruno)?
     
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  3. Pancake nothing wrong with the Ferraris tyres,as the­ LADS have said today, Ferrari and Mercedes gp Pertronas­ must be laughing their cotton socks off. Muckerclaren­ down 25 HP, thats 3/10 per lap, and then got carry 75­ ltr of fuel to do 100 kilometers, where as the Ferrari­ and Brawn will do 100 kilometers on 60 ltrs. FACT­ Pancake,MUCKLAREN and Force India to use the 2010 spec­ F0108 detuned as per F I A rules.Pancake Norbert is­ Boss like i say, i will keep the rest in my Head.
     
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  4. Hi Guy's,
    I'd kill for a few laps in it, but somehow I bet the G forces aren't quite the same. How can you simulate -5 G from a pseudo stationary platform? Also, the cornering loads would be tough as well.
     
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  5. The simulation of G force is possible but very difficult to get right. Sustained G-Force is another matter entirely and requires literally a warehouse to actuate the sim around. We have found in our practice of building professional grade racing simulators for training that it is much more important to give the driver an up to the millisecond sense of where the weight of the car is, than to spend much more money and time trying to make them feel like they are actually doing 95 kph in the corner.
     
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