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Porsche's 2006 Cayman S: Review


2006 Porsche Cayman S

With every new Porsche release, the press heralds it as the purest, the best, the most dramatic, the highest standard, and of course, revolutionary. So how do we know which car actually fits into these complimentary adjectives? They all do, each in their own unique way. The 2006 Cayman S is just as revolutionary as the 911 or the Carrera, with a distinct personality all her own to set her apart from her sisters.

While some critics have accused the Cayman S of being significantly underpowered by about 100 horse power, she still hold her own in the world of performance cars. Her initial speeds may be a little slower than her sisters, but for all but professionals, she has ample power for her design. Her clocked 0 to 60 speed is recorded at 5.1 seconds, although there are a few unverified times floating around out there claiming its really closer to 4.9 seconds. Either way, youll be cruising at 60 miles per hour before you get your favorite CD into the player. Her top speed of 171 miles per hour will still earn you a speeding ticket as fast as her sisters speeds of 193 miles per hour.

Adjustable dampers, more impressively known as the Porsche Active Suspension Management System, and the Porsche Ceramic Composite Braking System create a serious demon that can haul out through nearly any drivable surface while enabling the driver ample control and braking power. The steel coupe roof ahs added considerable stiffness and with that stiffness the tighter suspension provides an equally smooth ride as lighter cars with a more forgiving suspension while enhancing the Caymans ability to double her torsion rigidity. The damper rates are equally as effective, but the anti-roll bars are thicker.

The 3.4 litre M96 flat-6 engine spits out 295 horse power and 255 pounds per foot of torque. She has been steadily compared to the Boxster in every fashion, often written about as though she is just a Boxster with the replacement steel coupe roof. This is only quasi-accurate. She has many similarities to the Boxster, including her basic panels forward of the rear wheel well and the chassis, but she is still her own unique entity. In reality, the Boxster chassis are remarkably similar the 911. She shares the optional Ceramic Disc Brake Package, which cuts the weight of each brake rotor by half. The front dam has been tweaked a bit to allow for more air to cool the disks. Who can fault the Porsche engineers for following the old adage, if it aint broke, tweak it, but dont fix it?

The chassis come with the optional Porsche Active Suspension Management System and the standard Porsche Stability Management System. The Cayman also comes with the optional Chrono Sport Package. Decking this car out to be her absolute finest is a high tech acronymic dream as new owners add the CSP and the PASM and the PMS in order to improve (and count) their lap times, adjust their suspension, and of course increase the handling and drivability.

She stands alone in her significant and noticeable difference in her ultimate stability, balance, forgiveness, and her ability to take her lead in from the driver while encouraging a little more play from the modest or shy.

Underneath her hatch, her trunk space is definitely smaller than the Boxsters, but the deeper front trunk is actually a hair larger than the Boxsters. The instrumentation is nearly identical to the Boxsters just with different coloring. Some claim her storage capacity is better than her sisters and others claim its not. Personal preference is the only true determining factor in this case.


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  1. From the Lego kit analogy, it initially sounded like he was taking a Porsche factory turbo engine and putting it into a Cayman. But reading on, he’s adding turbos to the stock Cayman engine, correct?What internal mods are made to the engine?Inspired by Wilkinson’s earlier piece on IMS failures, I started doing more to get Cayman and Boxster owners involved in TrueDelta’s survey. 303 signed up so far, so we should eventually be able to provide some reasonably precise numbers on how often these engines actually fail.
     
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