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Driven: 2009 Tesla Roadster Will Make You An Electric-Car Believer

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We can't even count the number of performance-car owners and drivers who sneer at electric cars. Usually the phrase "golf carts" comes up.

Well, we guarantee that if you put each of them behind the wheel of a 2009 Tesla Roadster, they would emerge with their priorities radically re-sorted, starting to figure out where they can mount the recharging box in their garages. It's that kind of car.

Miracle torque

What causes this miraculous transformation? In a word, torque. Pure, seamless, unstoppable, rocket-to-the-moon torque.

No rev bands, no shift points, no heel-and-toeing. Just smooth and seemingly limitless power thrusting you forward, again and again and again.

Electric motors, remember, develop peak torque from 0 rpm. And the Tesla doesn't have a gearbox; the motor spins from 0 to 14,000 rpm to take the Roadster to its maximum speed of slightly above 100 miles per hour.

All about acceleration

And performance is really the whole point of the Tesla Roadster. Did we mention the 0-to-60-mph time of under 4 seconds?

Even if the company doesn't survive, the 900 Roadsters they've delivered to date will stand as proof that electric power can not only be practical but also amazingly, wonderfully, laugh-out-loud fun to drive.

(And, by the way, if you happen to live in Colorado, you can get a $42,000 tax credit against the Roadster's price of $109,000 if you complete the purchase before December 31 of this year. Shop now!)

Pros and cons

Acceleration, in fact, tops our list of things we like in TheCarConnection.com's review of the 2009 Tesla Roadster. The positives include:

  • Acceleration that shames many so-called supercars
  • Smooth and continuous rush of power at any speed
  • Excellent roadholding
  • Green credibility and awareness factor

On the downside, the 2009 Roadster has more than a handful of issues:

  • Range of much less than 200 miles if driven hard
  • Amenities just as primitive as the Lotus, at twice the price
  • Cockpit has essentially zero storage
  • Deeply annoying: Recharge cord costs $600 to $3,000 extra

Range: It depends

The factory quotes a range of 240 miles, but the almost universal consensus is that if the car is driven to take advantage of that power, that number drops substantially.

Earlier this year, we covered 58 road miles in three hours of hard driving up the twisty, hilly roads above Silicon Valley. The small information display, just above the driver's left knee, showed an indicated range that dropped from 202 miles to 110, so those 58 road miles used "92 miles" of projected range.

Unlearning old habits

Driving a Roadster most effectively requires unlearning some old habits. The first one is expecting engine noise: Switching on a 2009 Tesla—more accurately, powering up the car—lights up the instruments, silently. You know it's ready to roll when you hear a "bong" tone.

The second is braking. Tesla's engineers have made the regenerative braking so natural that within about 10 minutes, you'll find you can drive it almost entirely on one pedal, modulating your liftoff to slow the car at greater or lesser rates. The Brembo brakes are only needed below 5 mph, when the (electronically simulated) "idle creep" kicks in.

Point and squirt

Finally, like any high-performance car, you need to make sure it's pointed just where you intend to go before you floor it. Otherwise, the Roadster straightens abruptly and accelerates right through the outside of your curve. It's that powerful.


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Comments (7)
  1. The car REALLY IS MOSTLY Lotus!
    It doesn't matter what Tesla says. Facts are facts.
     
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  2. I drove one a while back, and it was so much fun. However, the whole "I need a tow truck to get back" thing when you go too far on your weekend joy ride would keep me out of it for now, if I had that kind of money...
     
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  3. bruce -- The Tesla Roadster shares between 6 and 7% parts with the Lotus Elise. It is NOT "mostly Lotus." Even if it were, I fail to find why that's bad. The Elise is an amazing sports car. The Roadster is longer, wider, has more passenger room, has a totally different and full carbon fiber body, etc. Shared parts are windshield, the great steering linkage, then small things like latches.
     
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  4. "I drove one a while back, and it was so much fun. However, the whole 'I need a tow truck to get back' thing when you go too far on your weekend joy ride would keep me out of it for now."
    1) you'd be ASTONISHED how many places there are to charge a car. Besides actual EV charging stations, which are already all over the place and are quickly popping up more and more, you can plug a TEsla into any household or 220v outlet. Every RV park, for instance, has 220v outlets and they're seriously way more common than most people think. When you actually start looking, they are all freakin' over the place and finding somewhere to charge is much, much easier than you'd expect
    2) The display shows you two ranges -- one is how far you have left to drive if you continue driving how you have been, the other is your 'ideal' range if you drive nicely. The car also reserves 10% of the battery charge, which you can select to tap into if necessary. In order to go "for a weekend joy ride" and find yourself stuck somewhere empty, you'd really have to ignore absolutely all of the warnings on the car and be retarded enough to just take off without any idea whatsoever of how many miles you were driving. It's really no easier to run out of charge in some random place than it is to run out of gasoline in your gas-powered car. It only takes the tiniest amount of forethought to avoid this situation.
     
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  5. Bruce - the only similarity is the price in Colorado! Get a Roadster for the same price as the Elise... WOW!
    The Roadster Sport can dust a Gallardo 0-60, I wouldn't care if the car was made of macaroni, that is an awesome statistic!
     
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  6. Wow, Bruce...I could say "Ignorance is bliss"...but you're so in the dark about the Roadster, you're almost blind. The Roadster will out-perform most exotics, for an eigth to a third of the price to BUY, and thousands less to own. The Roadster uses a "heavily-revised" Elise chassis...4 in. longer/6 in. wider...with Carbon Binding...not epoxy. It's made w/Carbon Fiber, not RM Fiberglass. It has a 65/35 weight balance, but handles more neutrally because the battery is positioned ahead of the rear wheel. Oh, and that Elise you're championing...has a Toyota engine. Is it fair to say the Elise is basically a Celica? It's American to say your opinion, but un-American to bash what you don't know! Tesla is the next GREAT AMERICAN CAR COMPANY...GET ON BOARD. They are going to save Automotive Industry!
     
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  7. The Volt is expected to go 400 miles before completely conking out." Completely wrong. The Volt is a REV so it can continue by simply filling with fuel. There is no limit to how far you can drive. It will not 'completely conk out' unless you run out of fuel and battery charge.
     
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