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2010 Geneva Motor Show Preview: NLV Quant Electric Supercar

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Extreme is a word that's bandied about all too easily in the realm of high-end supercars, but in the case of Koenigsegg it's simply the most accurate way to say it: the company's cars are extreme. The latest to join the Swedish stable is the Quant, revealed as a full-scale model at last year's Geneva Motor Show, and coming to this year's show as a near-production vehicle--this time, without Koenigsegg's involvement.

The vehicle above is in fact the brainchild of fellow Swedish firm NLV Solar AG--a pioneer in photovoltaics and electrical power technology. The project was born when NLV commissioned Koenigsegg to develop and design a “car of the future”, incorporating the company’s proprietary solar technology. The end result was the four-seater solar-electric Quant design model shown last year. This year, the car is all NLV, and it's closer to production guise.

The rear-wheel-drive Quant is powered by a pair of AC induction electric motors rated at a combined output of 512 horsepower and 527 pound-feet of torque. The twin-motor design eliminates the need for bevel gears or a differential, simplifying the layout and giving constant and controlled power proportioning to the rear wheels, in both drive and coast mode.

The projected curb weight of is 3,900 pounds, which should result to a 0-62 mph time of 5.2 seconds and a top speed of 170 mph. To help save as much weight as possible, the Quant features a carbon-fiber monotube backbone chassis and a proprietary power storage system called Flow Accumulator Energy Storage (FAES). Developed by NLV, the FAES system weighs a total of 450kg and contains no hazardous material or heavy metals like lithium-ion batteries being used by most other carmakers.

NLV claims the FAES system can be charged to full capacity in 20 minutes and give the vehicle a range of about 300 miles. Helping to extend the range is a solar-cell coating called thin-flm that is applied to the car’s body. Finally, the Quant is also fitted with a brake-energy recovery system.

The body of the Quant measures in at 16 feet in length, features a pair of gullwing doors, and can seat four adults. Interior features include multiple infotainment display screens, tri-zone climate control, and LED detailing.

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Comments (2)
  1. Charging in 20 minutes and going 500 km? Is that even possible, I've heard claims like this before but my Blackberry takes that long to charge and my AA battery charger takes an hour. But they do use different materials, the ones in this car are probably using materials that can react more quickly.

    I've heard you can charge batteries very fast by applying a lot of current but wouldn't that build up a lot of heat as well and do permanent damage to the battery?
     
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  2. We have not seen any evidence that such batteries exist, although there are a number of carmakers claiming to have such technology. Personally I am pretty skeptical but for the moment all we can do is report the claims.

    You have to remember that Koenigsegg at one point had the fastest production car in the world and nobody believed that they could do it. SSC is also proposing a new EV that sounds like it has technology very similar to the Quant. We'll just have to wait and see.
     
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