Is The Ford Mustang A Deadly Car? Stats Say Yes


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According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) the Ford Mustang ranks in a tie for the eleventh spot on their list of the Most deadliest vehicles on the road with 150 deaths per million vehicles.  The list was gathered from vehicles on the road between 2002 and 2005 and all the vehicles range in year from 2001-2004. 

I would not read to much into this list because it does not show driving habits, age, price of the car, how many units were made or any crash tests for said model.  I would definately not let these lists sway you into purchasing one car or another just because of how many fatalities per million.  Nobody knows what contributing factors caused each specific accident or what type of person was driving each vehicle.

Just to give you an example, the vehicles on the highest vehicle death list are relatively inexpensive sporty models that are probably driven by younger less experienced drivers.  The vehicles on the lowest vehicle deaths per million list and the models are basically just the opposite of the other list with those being typically higher priced and larger vehicles for older more financially secure family minded people.  I bet if you switched drivers from the less expensive sporty models to that of the higher priced luxury models and vice versa the fatality numbers would probably decrease because you are putting less experienced drivers in safer larger vehicles while putting older defensive drivers in the sporty models.  I feel like I have just confused myself and probably you as well with that explanation but I hope my point was understood.

Check out the lists after the jump and make your own conclusions.

 
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